PĀTEKE (BROWN TEAL)

Pāteke are among New Zealand's most endangered birds, so we’re so privileged to have four breeding pairs now at home on Rotoroa Island.

These four pāteke breeding pairs, translocated from Christchurch's Peacock Springs, were settled into wetlands on Rotoroa Island in 2015 and 2016-a move that has boosted advocacy and educational opportunities for this endangered endemic waterfowl, as well as contributed to growing its wild population.

Pāteke are among New Zealand's most endangered birds, so we're so privileged to have three breeding pairs now at home on Rotoroa Island. These three pāteke breeding pairs, translocated from Christchurch's Peacock Springs, were settled into wetlands on Rotoroa Island in September 2015-a move that has boosted advocacy and educational opportunities for this endangered endemic waterfowl, as well as contributed to growing its wild population.
The new arrivals, approved for transfer by the Department of Conservation's pāteke recovery group, are all fitted with transmitters to enable regular monitoring. The birds will also be supplementary fed via feeding hoppers at the three respective wetland areas as part of the birds' intensive conservation management.
"With our Rotoroa Island Trust colleagues, we're delighted that we can increase advocacy for, and assist in the recovery of, this endangered wetlands bird," says Auckland Zoo director, Jonathan Wilcken. "Through the education programmes we offer on the island, visiting school groups will be able to see and learn about these birds and also participate in hands-on conservation training as part of this project's goal of fostering future conservationists."
The new resident pāteke will hopefully go on to breed, and their offspring will either be moved to new sites or allowed to disperse naturally as there are wild pāteke on Coromandel and Great Barrier Island, both a relatively short flight away. The pāteke is the seventh New Zealand native species to be introduced to Rotoroa Island under our partnership with Auckland Zoo.Pāteke are among New Zealand's most endangered birds, so we're so privileged to have three breeding pairs now at home on Rotoroa Island. These three pāteke breeding pairs, translocated from Christchurch's Peacock Springs, were settled into wetlands on Rotoroa Island in September 2015-a move that has boosted advocacy and educational opportunities for this endangered endemic waterfowl, as well as contributed to growing its wild population.

The new arrivals, approved for transfer by the Department of Conservation's pāteke recovery group, are all fitted with transmitters to enable regular monitoring. The birds will also be supplementary fed via feeding hoppers at the three respective wetland areas as part of the birds' intensive conservation management.

"With our Rotoroa Island Trust colleagues, we're delighted that we can increase advocacy for, and assist in the recovery of, this endangered wetlands bird," says Auckland Zoo director, Jonathan Wilcken. "Through the education programmes we offer on the island, visiting school groups will be able to see and learn about these birds and also participate in hands-on conservation training as part of this project's goal of fostering future conservationists."

The new resident pāteke will hopefully go on to breed, and their offspring will either be moved to new sites or allowed to disperse naturally as there are wild pāteke on Coromandel and Great Barrier Island, both a relatively short flight away. The pāteke is the seventh New Zealand native species to be introduced to Rotoroa Island under our partnership with Auckland Zoo.

See Auckland Zoo's Zoo Tales documentary about the pateke on Rotoroa Island.